National Trust Appoints 18 Feet & Rising As Lead Creative Agency

The National Trust is to work with agency 18 Feet & Rising as its lead creative partner, following a competitive pitch process.

The brief is to develop an overarching brand strategy that helps deliver the Trust’s core charitable purpose – looking after special places for ever, for everyone – whilst broadening the charity’s appeal.

The Trust has performed well through the economic downturn, seeing record visitor numbers of 19 million in 2011 and reaching four million members last autumn, but the charity knows the brand can extend its relevance and appeal to more people.

18 Feet & Rising will be at the forefront of evolving perceptions of the Trust, opening up conversations with new and existing audiences and facilitating experiences between people and the places that are special to them.

Clare Mullin, Director of Brand & Marketing at National Trust, said: “We are delighted to be working with 18 Feet & Rising as our lead creative agency.

“They clearly understand our strategic priorities and have shown that they can help make the Trust relevant today through their strategy and creative.

“They’ve really challenged us and we’re excited by the work we can do with them going forwards.”

Jonathan Trimble, Managing Partner at 18 Feet & Rising, said: “It’s fantastic to be working with such a special organisation. The Trust has a unique role in terms of the country’s relationships with special places.

“It gives us the chance to bring our creativity to bear in unique ways with unique people.”

First steps for 18 Feet & Rising will be to develop the brand strategy, working across the Trust’s 5,000 staff and the 62,000 people who assist with the Trust’s volunteer projects to express the brand in an authentic and joined-up way. They’ll also take on the challenge of developing the Trust’s 2013 national campaign.

Throughout the pitch, the National Trust has been supported by pitch consultancy Agency Insight.

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First Images Of WWII German Submarine Sunk 68 Years Ago In Brazil

The U-Boat was located by the Schurmann Family in July 2011. Almost one year after locating the submarine, the Schurmanns joined efforts with deep sea diving experts to collect images of the U-513. With specialized technology, using a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV) the expedition made a 135 meters dive to film and take pictures of the wreck, for the first time in history.

“After years of research, finally we watched this historical moment. We first saw a shadow then gradually the images became very clear, the submarine is almost intact and whole as if she was placed there to sleep” said Vilfredo Schurmann leader of the expedition.

“The ROV (Remotely operated underwater vehicle) did several dives and with every new image we celebrated this great feat” says David Schurmann, the film director.

It all began in 2001 aboard their sailing yacht “Aysso”, when the Schurmanns a well-known sailing and expedition family in Brazil, was told of the story of a German submarine, sunk in 1943 during WWII in the waters of Southern Brazil.

Vilfredo and Heloisa Schurmann where hooked on the mysterious story and started researching the facts in the National Archives in Washington – USA, Berlin – Germany and in Rio de Janeiro – Brazil.

They were granted a license from the Brazilian Navy, and obtained the support of the Santa Catarina Government and UNIVALI University and were sponsored by TOTVS, CPE (Coastal Planning & Engineering) and FUGRO BRAZIL to further the search.

A team of 35 professionals (all volunteers) which included divers, oceanographers, retired officers from the Brazilian and USA Navy & Air Force, archaeologists, historians, filmmakers and the last surviving member of the USA airplane responsible for the U-boat sinking aided on the search.

After 2 years and 18 expeditions at sea, operating Side Scanning Sonars and Magnetometer, on July 17th 2011 on board their adapted sailing yacht “Aysso”, the Schurmanns located the exact position of the sunken submarine.

On March 8, 2012, aboard two ships, the expedition led by Vilfredo Schurmann and a crew of 20, filmed for the first time in history since her sinking 68 years ago, images of U-513. The U-boat is considered one of the WWII submarines sunk furthers away from Germany during battle.

THE UNDERWATER FILMING
The underwater footage of the U-513 was made with a ROV model Sea Eye Falcon Marine, capable of operating up to 300 meters deep, assigned and operated by FUGRO BRAZIL.

S/V “Aysso” and M/V “Thunder” anchored at the location, launched the ROV (Remotely operated underwater vehicle) and with sonar-aided navigation (similar to a ship’s radar – working under water) located the submarine.

The recordings were performed with the ROV camera itself. For best results, HD 3D cameras were also mounted in housings to captured images of the submarine.

Sponsors: TOTVS, CPE, FUGRO BRAZIL
Support: Santa Catarina Government and UNIVALI University

HISTORY
The U-513, under the command of the German captain Karl Friedrich Guggenberger, had the mission to sink any enemy vessel on the route between Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro. She had already torpedoed three ships, including two Americans and a Brazilian.

The U-Boat-513 sank on July 19th, 1943. Lieutenant Roy S. Whitcomb was on a PBM-VP-74 flying-boat bomber on an antisubmarine sweep and spotted the surfaced U-boat. He ordered the attack. Captain Guggenberger on the deck of the submarine saw the approaching plane, he knew there was no time to submerge and began a counterattack. Whitcomb’s dropped six 225-pound bombs depth charges and the U-boat absorbed the full impact on her hull.

The U-513, 76 meters in length sunk immediately with its 46 crew. 7 men who were on deck where the only survivors, among them the captain Guggenberger.

THE SCHURMANN FAMILY
The Schurmann Family is the first Brazilian family to circumnavigate the world on a sailboat and the only Brazilian family to have done it twice. A household name in Brazil, the Schurmann Family has been active around the world through their online school program, as well as their films and TV programs.

In 1984 Vilfredo, Heloisa and their children left their home, their work and school and set off from Florianópolis, the capital city of the State of Santa Catarina, in southern Brazil, to pursue their dream: circumnavigate the world on a sailing yacht.

Their children, Pierre, David and Wilhelm, were 15, 10 and 7 years old. On this first adventure, the Schurmann Family spent 10 years at sea.

In 1997 the Schurmann Family began their second great adventure Magellan Global Adventure. The goal was to retrace the route sailed by Ferdinand Magellan’s fleet, the first complete circumnavigation of the planet. For this adventure, apart from the parents only their son David Schurmann and Kat, their 5-year-old daughter went along. Magellan Global Adventure was followed by more than 1,5 million people, from 44 countries. Every month the adventure’s filmed reports, broadcast internationally, had an average of 40 million television viewers in Brazil and many more around the world. After 30 months, the Schurmann’s yacht returned to Brazil.

The Family members are: Vilfredo, Heloisa, Pierre, David, Wilhelm and Kat Schurmann (d. 2006).
They have released 4 best sellers in Brazil and one box office hit documentary film: Books
• Em Busca do Sonho (2006) Portuguese
• Momentos De uma Aventura (2001) Portuguese/English
• Um Mundo de Aventuras (2002) Portuguese
• 10 Anos No Mar (1995) Portuguese

Films & TV
• O Mundo em Duas Voltas (The World in Two Round Trips) 2007 (Film)
• Em Busca do Sonho (Film)
• Magellan Global Adventure (TV Series)
• Schurmann Family 20 years (TV Series)

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National Trust’s Director-General to step down

The National Trust has announced that Fiona Reynolds has decided to leave the charity after more than 11 years as Director-General.

Fiona is to take up her duties as Master of Emmanuel College, University of Cambridge, in the autumn of 2013 – the first woman to be elected Master in the College’s history.

She said: “As a graduate of Cambridge I am thrilled to be going back to head one of its finest colleges.

“I have loved every minute leading the National Trust and working with our passionate and dedicated staff, volunteers and supporters.

“I am incredibly proud of all that we have achieved in the last 11 years.

“There is no organisation like it and I will miss it terribly. But it is time to allow someone else an opportunity to make their mark.”

Fiona has overseen a period of transformational change at the National Trust, reconnecting the organisation with its original founding purpose, and infusing it with warmth and liveliness.

Membership hit four million last year from 2.7 million in 2001, and visitor numbers to the Trust’s 300 properties reached 19 million from 10 million a decade ago. Volunteer numbers have also doubled, with 62,000 people involved last year.

From her earliest days at the Trust Fiona pioneered an ‘arms open’ approach to conservation, bringing expert work out from behind closed doors to take place in front of visitors, now an integral part of the Trust’s programme to bring places to life.

Property acquisitions have included the vast Victorian Gothic Tyntesfield and its estate near Bristol, Vanbrugh’s Seaton Delaval Hall in Northumberland, the ‘back-to-back’ terraced houses in Birmingham, John Lennon’s boyhood home in Liverpool and the quirky home of Kenyan-born poet Khadambi Asalache in Wandsworth.

These acquisitions have been part of a concerted focus on social and community relevance for the Trust, recently underlined by the long-term lease taken out on Tredegar House in South East Wales.

As a geographer and walker with a passionate interest in landscape, she has systematically added to the 617,000 acres of countryside under the Trust’s care.

During this time she has championed the importance of access to the outdoors and nature for people’s wellbeing and promoted local and seasonal food with a drive to create 1,000 new allotments on National Trust land.

Most recently, this included the acquisition of the 617-acre Llyndy Isaf estate near Snowdon after a public appeal raised £1 million in seven months from 20,000 donors.

She has overseen a restructure of the governance of the charity, from a 52-member Council to a 12-member Board of Trustees, as well as two major internal restructures which have strengthened and localised the organisation.

While maintaining the Trust’s strict party-political neutrality, Fiona has championed its conservation principles, most recently leading the charge against proposed changes to the planning framework which, she warned, would bias planning towards excessive building in the countryside.

Fiona, 53, will continue in her post at the National Trust until her successor is in place. She plans to use the interval between leaving and moving to Cambridge in September 2013 to write a book about her years at the Trust.

Via EPR Network
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AAFLC Rescues Missing Children In Lebanon

Mark Miller and Patricia Moore of the American Association For Lost Children (AAFLC) will be featured in Lifetime’s newest series, Twisted Fate, which will air Sunday, March 4, 2012 on the Biography Channel at 10:00pm ET.

When Nabela Henry’s two children were ripped from her grasp and taken to the Middle East by her ex-husband, she found a hidden strength she never knew she had. Her two children, Nora, 5, and Ramsey, 7, had been missing for three years and everything that she tried had failed. Nabela Henry contacted AAFLC for help. AAFLC rescued Nora and Ramsey in war-torn Tripoli, Lebanon 7 months after Ms. Henry contacted AAFLC.

AAFLC is an awesome and unique non-profit 501(c)(3) charity that actively finds and rescues missing children at no cost to searching parents. Volunteers of all ages play a key role in helping to mobilize AAFLC. You can make a difference with your life and be part of a wonderful ministry that finds and rescues missing children. To read more about the dynamic charitable work of American Association For Lost Children (AAFLC), and how you can help, visit www.AAFLC.ORG or call (724) 537-6970.

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