Tag Archives: Education

MATT Board Member Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of San Antonio Appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Los Angeles

Archbishop Jose H. Gomez, member of the Mexicans and Americans Thinking Together (MATT) board of directors since 2006,was recently appointed by Pope Benedict XVI as Coadjutor Archbishop of Los Angeles.

MATT Board Member Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of San Antonio Appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Los Angeles

“Archbishop Gomez has been an invaluable asset to our organization, offering wisdom, vision and leadership. We are honored that he will continue to serve and be actively involved on our board as MATT continues to develop and grow,” stated MATT Chairman of the Board Alonso Ancira.

MATT, a bi-national, non-profit organization committed to improving the quality of life of both Mexicans and Americans living in Mexico and the United States, has as one of its top priorities the integration of immigrants into American society. As a result, MATT launched an English immersion program dedicated to teach functional English to Spanish-speaking individuals utilizing practical case scenarios such as renting an apartment, opening a bank account, and applying for a job. The lessons are transmitted on the Guadalupe Radio Network and the workbooks are distributed free through parishes and schools. Archbishop Gomez was instrumental in spearheading the MATT Maestro en Casa pilot program, currently implemented in Texas.“Archbishop Gomez had the vision of helping those who lack the communication skills crucial for a healthy and prosperous integration. Without his guidance, Maestro en Casa would not have been as successful as it is today. With Archbishop Gomez involvement, we were able to launch MATT MEC successfully in Texas and are able to expand its presence effectively in other communities, including Los Angeles,” confirms Aracely Garcia-Granados, executive director of MATT.

The MATT family is proud to have had the opportunity to know Archbishop Gomez well and his dedication to the community. MATT is confidant that Archbishop Gomez will be an invaluable asset to all Catholics, primarily those in the Los Angeles metropolitan area. As a native of Monterrey, Mexico, Archbishop Gomez possesses a keen understanding of the hardship, struggles, and needs of migrant communities.“Pope Benedict XVI could not have made a more appropriate appointment at the most timely of moments in our history,” commented Ancira. “He has been a tremendous force in our community and we are confident that this is just the beginning of a most enlightening future for Archbishop Gomez.”

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First Nations Development Institute Releases Research Report On 7871 Organizations

First Nations Development Institute recently completed a research project on 7871 charitable organizations, their institutional structures, and best practices for their management. This research resulted in a report titled Charitable and Sovereign: Understanding Tribal 7871 Organizations.

In 1982, Congress passed the Indian Tribal Governmental Tax Status Act, codified as Section 7871 of the Internal Revenue Code, treating tribal governments as state governments for a variety of specified tax purposes. One of these purposes was to allow tribal governments and their programs to receive tax-deductible donations. Many tribes have used the 7871 tax code to develop tribal charitable and philanthropic organizations. These organizations include educational scholarship programs, economic development organizations, and grant making foundations.

First Nations’ research revealed that while there are a large number of these so called “7871 organizations” that provide social service, economic development, educational, and other charitable programming, only a small number of them are actively raising external funds. Most such programs are funded by tribal governments or federal funding streams. However, as tribes look to diversify both their programs and funding streams, an increasing number of tribal programs are using Section 7871 to facilitate fundraising as charitable organizations. Use of the Section 7871 designation to create philanthropic and charitable entities is increasingly popular as tribes seek ways to protect their sovereignty while still promoting philanthropic activities.

The report had the following additional key findings:

1. There is great programmatic and organizational diversity among 7871 organizations.
2. There are significant barriers to fundraising for 7871 organizations.
3. The myth of “rich gaming tribes” persists as a barrier to fundraising for 7871 organizations.
4. Federal legislation is inconsistent in its treatment of 7871 organizations and their eligibility for federal grant programs.
5. There are a large number of tribes that have spun off 501(c)(3) organizations to remove barriers to fundraising.
6. There is a need to establish best practices to reassure prospective donors to 7871 organizations.

“We hope this report will raise awareness about the important role that 7871 organizations play in providing services to tribal members,” stated Michael E. Roberts, President of First Nations Development Institute. “There is still a lot of confusion about what these organizations are and what they do. We hope this report will clarify many issues.” One goal of the report is to educate program officers at foundations so they are more comfortable working with 7871 organizations. “We hope to educate members of mainstream philanthropy on this topic,” stated Sarah Vermillion, Vice President for First Nations Development Institute.

First Nations’ research included a national survey and case studies and interviews with five active or former 7871 organizations. This research was funded by the Cultures of Giving Fund, established at the Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors with major support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

To download a free copy of this report, visit our website at www.firstnations.org and follow the links from the home page.

For more than 28 years, using a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating for Systemic Change, Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations Development Institute has been working to restore Native American control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities. First Nations serves rural and reservation-based Native American communities throughout the United States.

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First Nations Receives $800,000 Grant

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) announced today that it has been awarded a two-year, $800,000 grant f r o m a new program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Strengthening Communities Fund (SCF), created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. First Nations will also provide an additional $200,000 in funding to the project bringing the total budget to $1 million (80% Federal funds and 20% nongovernmental sources) over two years.

The objective of the grant is to enable nonprofit organizations to contribute to the economic recovery and help Federal, State, local, and Indian/Native American Tribal governments ensure that the information and services described in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) reach disadvantaged and hard-to-serve populations. The grant to First Nations is f r o m the Nonprofit Capacity Building program which made one-time awards up to $1 million to experienced lead organizations to provide nonprofit organizations — or project partners — with capacity building training, technical assistance, and competitive financial assistance. A minimum of 55% of the Federal funds awarded must be provided to project partners through a competitive (subgrant) process.

Specifically, through this grant project, First Nations will work to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations, whether secular or faith based, to address the broad economic recovery issues present in their (Native American) communities. With SCF funding, First Nations Development Institute will provide nonprofit capacity building services to targeted rural and reservation-based Native American communities in the United States. Project participants will be selected f r o m 22 targeted Native American communities located in Arizona, Minnesota, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Utah that have excessive poverty and low income statistics according to the U.S. Census.

Services will include providing comprehensive organizational effectiveness assessment for each of the organizations or groups selected; culturally appropriate training in organizational development; program development; collaboration/community engagement; leadership development; evaluation of effectiveness and development of individualized, tailored and culturally appropriate technical assistance plans. Recipients will be formally organized 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations, tribal§7871 organizations or community organizations which have not achieved this status. Recipients will be Native American-controlled and will serve the targeted rural or reservation-based Native American communities. Native American groups that are faith-based will be eligible to participate in this SCF-funded project, as long as the programs or services that will improve in capacity as a result of this project will not include inherently religious activities. Additionally, First Nations will provide $440,000 in grants to rural and reservation-based Native American nonprofit organizations and community groups for the purpose of capacity building in the areas listed above.

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Governor Rick Perry to be Honored at Dallas Downtown Pregnancy Center “Light of Life” Event

Join the Downtown Pregnancy Center for its annual “Light of Life” fundraising dinner and gala. Keynote speaker, Texas Governor Rick Perry, will be honored for his leadership in the pro-life cause as the Downtown Pregnancy Center celebrates 252 babies saved last year.

Who:
• Rick Perry, Governor of the State of Texas
• Carolyn Cline, Executive Director, Downtown Pregnancy Center
• DPC Clients sharing personal stories

When:
Saturday, September 26, 2009
VIP Reception with Governor Perry – 5:30 – 6:15 pm
Dinner & Gala – 6:30 – 9:00 pm

Where: The Fairmont Hotel – 1717 N. Akard Street – Dallas TX 75201

Downtown Pregnancy Center (DPC) is Empowering Women Through Knowledge. Founded in 1994 to serve women and their partners who found themselves in an unplanned pregnancy, all services provided are confidential, and offered without cost to clients. The DPC provides pregnancy testing, sonograms, options counseling, and STD screening and treatment in addition to sexual health, prenatal and parenting education. Clients are invited to join the EARN WHILE YOU LEARN program where they can earn vouchers to purchase needed maternity and baby items while participating in educational programs. The compassionate care given by the dedicated staff and volunteers of the DPC provides a safe place for women to make an informed decision during a difficult and challenging time in her life. Please visit: www.downtownpc.org.

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Virgin Games Set To Raise 10k For Charity Kids Company

On Saturday 18th September, the team at Virgin Games will be putting on their best red cycling shorts and embarking on a charity bike ride from London to Brighton. Setting off from the company’s HQ in Hammersmith, the team of 40 employees will be braving the 84 kilometres with the aim of raising a target of £10,000 for their chosen Virgin Unite charity, Kids Company. Founded by Camilla Batmanghelidjh in 1996 in order to provide practical, emotional and educational support to vulnerable inner-city children and young people, Kids Company are supported by Virgin Unite who pledged to raise 2.5million by April 2010. As part of the Virgin Group, the London to Brighton charity bike ride is part of Virgin Games contribution to this goal.

Regularly offering their time and support to Kids Company, previous activities have included the Virgin Games team pulling together to redecorate an East London School and most recently arranging a sports day for children in Hackney. This year, the team of mixed cycling abilities will set off together at 8am and hope to reach their final destination of Brighton beach by 4 pm having raised £10,000 with all stragglers accounted for! Keen cyclist Warren Eloff, Product Manager, who regularly cycles into work is tipped to lead the pack and CEO, Simon Burridge who is sitting on the saddle for the first time in 20 years , is set to surprise his team with his ‘dusted down’ cycling skills!

Simon Burridge, CEO at Virgin Games and Virgin Unite trustee comments: “At Virgin Games we are passionate about Virgin Unite and the work that Kids Company carry out in the communities they work with. We believe Kids Company are a great charity and realise our support is all the more important now, with the current economic climate making it harder for them to achieve the funding they need to keep up the great work they are doing with young people all over the capital. I can’t think of more deserving charity to be brushing the cobwebs off my cycling shorts for!”

Visit http://www.virginunite.com/fundraiser/Virgin-Games-go-to-Brighton to make a donation and support the Virgin Games team.

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First Nations Launches Native Asset Building Partnership Project

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) released the names of the advisory committee members for its new Native Asset-Building Partnership. Members include Anita Fineday, Chief Judge of the White Earth Tribal Nation; Tadd Johnson, Special Counsel for Government Affairs for the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe; Susan White, Director of the Oneida Trust Department; former Senior Vice President and board member of First Nations, Sherry Salway Black; Elsie Meeks, Director of the USDA Rural Development Office; attorney Margaret Schaff, partner at Schaff & Clark-Deschene; Tracy Fischer, Interim President of the First Nations Oweesta Cooperation; and Michael E. Roberts, President of First Nations Development Institute.

The goal of the Native Asset-Building Partnership Project is to strengthen tribal and Native institutions in Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota through tribal nation-to-nation peer learning and model development that will lead to improved control and management of assets for the benefit of Native communities and individuals. Advisory committee member Susan White said, “Peer mentoring will provide ideas and processes on how Indians as the true stakeholders can gain greater control over their own assets. Applying mentoring objectives will elevate a tribe’s ability to be more self-determined and therefore gain greater control over their own assets.”

First Nations’ goal is to partner tribes around specified assets and allow them to share best practices for asset stewardship and management. “Through this project we will be able to continue to ask questions from our brothers and sisters at other tribal nations and create long-term enduring benefit to Indian Country,” notes advisory committee member Anita Fineday who is Chief Judge of the White Earth Tribal Nation located in White Earth, Minnesota.

Sherry Salway Black said “assets are incredibly important for individuals, families, communities, and nations – including tribal nations. The ownership, control, management and development of current assets and creation and acquisition of new assets taken together are wealth and assure a better future.”

The Native Asset-Building Project advisory committee is composed of national and regional leaders familiar with asset-building in Native American communities. “First Nations is grateful to have the participation of such well respected national and regional leaders in Indian Country,” said Michael E. Roberts. The project advisory committee will assist in engaging tribes and Native organizations in the targeted states to determine asset-building needs and regionally-relevant models and assist in the planning and hosting of an asset-building conference that will take place in Minneapolis, Minnesota this fall.

The Native American Asset Building Project is a two-year project funded by the Otto Bremer Foundation, based in Saint Paul, Minnesota. For more information about First Nations’ Native Asset Building Project, contact Raymond Foxworth, Research Officer for First Nations at 303-774-7836 or rfoxworth@firstnations.org.

About First Nations Development Institute
Founded in 1980, First Nations Development Institute is a national Native American-led nonprofit organization. Through a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating for Systemic Change, and Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations Development Institute is working to restore Native control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities. To learn more about First Nations, visit: www.firstnations.org.

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Refund Anticipation Loans Cost EITC Filers In Native Communities Over $9,100,000 In 2005

Tax day has come and gone, and this year many people opted to get their tax refund a quick but expensive way: they took out a Refund Anticipation Loan. A Refund Anticipation Loan (or RAL) is a one to two week loan made by banks on behalf of filers, facilitated by tax preparers, and secured by a taxpayer’s expected tax refund. RALs are marketed as a way to “get your money quickly” and result in the users paying substantial fees to access their tax refund usually only five to ten days faster than for tax returns filed electronically. The average expense of the one to two week loan can be the equivalent of 50 to 500 percent APR, depending on the total fee and loan term. According to a report just released by First Nations Development Institute and the Center for Responsible Lending, Refund Anticipation Loans drained over $9,100,000 from Native American communities in 2005.

First Nations Development Institute and the Center for Responsible Lending’s report Borrowed Time: Use of Refund Anticipation Loans Among EITC Filers in Native American Communities documents the use of these costly loan programs on reservations and in other Native American communities. Researchers looked at the use of Refund Anticipation Loans in ten states with high Native American populations, and found that residents in counties with a large Native American population (such as counties with reservations in their boundaries) were more likely to take out Refund Anticipation Loans than residents of other counties. This is true despite the remote rural location of many of these counties, where there are few tax preparation businesses. In South Dakota, residents of counties with a high Native American population are five times as likely to take out a Refund Anticipation Loan. In North Dakota, residents of counties with a high Native American population are 11 times as likely to take out a Refund Anticipation Loan.

Most striking is the fact that the use of RALs is quite high among tax filers receiving the Earned Income Tax Credit in Native communities. The Earned Income Tax Credit was originally designed to supplement the earnings of low-to-moderate income families, and in 2009 a family of four could qualify for up to $4,824 in tax credits. Borrowed Time: Use of Refund Anticipation Loans Among EITC Filers in Native American Communities documents that in some Native communities, over seven out of every ten EITC filers received a RAL. In one county in South Dakota, nine out of every ten EITC filers received a RAL. In South Dakota, 8% of every EITC credit in Native communities was spent on taking out a RAL. This means that eight cents of every $1.00 of EITC credit in Native communities was diverted from its original target, working families, and instead went into the pockets of paid tax preparers.

Because Refund Anticipation Loans have a significant cost for Native communities, Borrowed Time: Use of Refund Anticipation Loans Among EITC Filers in Native American Communities provides recommendations for reducing their use. The first recommendation is to increase and support Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites in and near Native communities to allow filers to access free tax preparation services. In many cases, EITC filers and other filers may simply not be aware that they can access their tax refund without using a RAL. The authors of the report also recommend establishing an interest rate cap for RALs, and conducting public education campaigns in Native communities to encourage people to avoid paying high fees for RALs.

This landmark report is the result of a research study conducted under a grant funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. For more information about this publication, contact Sarah Dewees, Director of Research for First Nations Development Institute, at 540-907-6247 / sdewees@firstnations.org; or visit First Nations Development Institute’s website at www.firstnations.org to download a free copy of the paper.

Through a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating Systemic Change, and Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations is working to restore Native control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities.

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Upcoming Forum To Highlight Parkinson’s Advocacy

The Parkinson’s Action Network (PAN) will host its annual Research & Public Policy Forum on March 15-17 in Washington, D.C. It’s a chance for one of PAN’s state coordinators to continue an advocacy she bolstered with her wildly successful book.

Kay Mixson Jenkins is the south Georgia state coordinator for PAN and the founder of Parkinson’s in the Park. She is also a published author whose book, Who Is Pee Dee? Explaining Parkinson’s Disease to a Child, was recently purchased for overseas distribution. 

The book follows a boy named Colt and his toy panda bear, Pee Dee, as they seek to understand the chronic illness and its effects on Colt’s mother. The book has drawn praise from Parkinson’s advocates and patients alike.

“I’ve heard from people all over the country who have told me that prior to reading the book, their children never asked them about their Parkinson’s,” says Ms. Jenkins. “I had one gentleman call me from Illinois to tell me that his godson had bought him a stuffed bear to comfort him during a hospital visit.”

Ms. Jenkins says the forum is a good way for Parkinson’s patients to lobby their representatives, a battle she says sometimes feels hopeless. 

“We’ve struggled for years to convince our legislators to dedicate more money to research,” says Ms. Jenkins, “They’ve watched us just deteriorate each year and you can’t move them.”

Ms. Jenkins will not be attending the PAN forum in Washington, D.C. because her husband is battling cancer. It will be the first time she has missed the event since 2002. Ms. Jenkins was diagnosed with PD at the age of thirty-four and has been an advocate for research and patient support since then. Her book, which was published by the pharmaceutical company UCB, has gained a following among families touched by the disease.

Who Is Pee Dee? includes resources for Parkinson’s patients and valuable lessons for their children, including:

• An easy-to-understand explanation of the disease 
• Examples of how loved ones might be affected by the disease 
• Encouragement and reinforcement that the children have done nothing wrong 
• Fun ways in which children can help their loved ones feel better

“There will be five advocates from Georgia going to the forum,” says Ms. Jenkins.“We’re going to keep trying to change the legislators’ minds.” 

Kay Mixson Jenkins is the Georgia state co-coordinator for the Parkinson’s Action Network, leads the Effingham County Parkinson’s support group and was selected as a Parkinson’s patient advocate for UCB, Inc. 

For more information, contact the author directly via kmj@ParkinsonsInThePark.org.

(Who Is Pee Dee? Explaining Parkinson’s Disease to a Child by Kay Mixson Jenkins; illustrated by Richard Morgan; ISBN: 978-0-9819129-0-5; $12.95; 33 pages; 8” x 8”; hardcover; UCB, Inc.)

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Npower’s Generosity Helps Kids At Cedars School Get Around

npower’s donation of £17,000 towards a brand new mini bus has meant that students at Cedars School Sports College in Low Fell can, once again, take part in extra-curricular activities including trips to the swimming baths, leisure centre, parks and theatres.

The school caters for the needs of children with physical and speech and language disorders and when one of their mini-buses failed its MOT, fund-raising for a new Variety Club bus was moved to the top of the list of priorities. The challenge was to raise over £15,500 within six months. It was a chance conversation with npower’s Wes Craig, the uncle of Michael Craig, one of the senior students at The Cedars that raised the possibility of some help.

Wes referred the request to the npower charities board and £17,000 was donated to the school. Jane Fraser, head teacher at The Cedars, is delighted, saying:”npower’s response truly was the answer to a prayer! We’ve already used the new bus for a wide variety of trips and visits. It provides the children with an opportunity to broaden their education in sporting and cultural activities.

“We have put the remaining £1,500 to kick off the fund-raising to replace the second old mini-bus, as that, too, is on its last tyres.”

Wes was amongst a group of npower staff invited to join in the celebration of receiving the new bus. He found the experience a humbling one, explaining: “It was good to be able to do something positive for the Cedars in return for all the help and support they have given Michael and many other children, over the years.”

About npower
npower is one of Britain’s largest electricity suppliers and supplies gas, electricity and related services to 6.6 million customers across the UK.

RWE npower has been awarded the prestigious CommunityMark from Business in the Community (BITC). npower is the only utility business, amongst 21 other companies in the UK, to receive this accolade. The CommunityMark is a new BITC standard which has been created to recognise companies that are good investors in local communities and who have brought about real and positive changes.

The npower Active programme, which is run in partnership with the English Federation of Disability Sport, has been awarded a prestigious ‘Silver Big Tick’ by Business in the Community.

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npower Staff Offer Stoneferry Primary A Helping Hand

Eight volunteers from npower’s Hull offices on Clough Road were given the opportunity to offer a helping hand to Stoneferry Primary School this week. The staff took time out of their working day to help tackle a gardening project with the head teacher in order to improve the school environment for the pupils and teachers to enjoy.

On arrival at the school, donned in npower t-shirts, the volunteers were first introduced to the whole school in morning assembly. It was here that they had the opportunity to explain to the children where they had come from, their purpose for visiting the school and the aims of the task. After this, the npower staff fully immersed themselves in the project, stopping only for lunch with the children.

The volunteers sowed plants, laid bark chippings, installed a bird feeder and cut back overgrown shrubbery. At the end of the afternoon an area of the playground had been rejuvenated into a bright, vibrant place for children to play in and hopefully attract some wildlife to the area.

Head Teacher Jo Harrison was delighted with the team’s efforts, commenting: “Our school is surrounded by industry and the initiative provided a great opportunity for a local company close to Stoneferry Primary school to become involved in community work. We are very grateful to npower and the staff who all volunteered – giving their time and money in making a big difference to our school environment.”

Leading the npower volunteering team, Lisa Thompson added: “The team had a fantastic day undertaking their volunteering task and worked really hard in getting the playground more accessible for the children. The challenge was to bring more greenery to the area with various plants and a bird box to attract wildlife. The playground is now a safer environment and we feel this project was a great chance to make a positive contribution to the local school children.”

npower encourages its personnel to take on volunteering tasks to benefit local communities and the day was run in conjunction with CSV (Community Service Volunteers), who deliver the employee volunteer programme for RWE npower.

About npower
npower is one of Britain’s largest electricity suppliers and supplies gas, electricity and related services to 6.6 million customers across the UK. RWE npower has been awarded the prestigious CommunityMark from Business in the Community (BITC).

npower is the only utility business, amongst 21 other companies in the UK, to receive this accolade. The CommunityMark is a new BITC standard which has been created to recognise companies that are good investors in local communities and who have brought about real and positive changes.

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The next generation of Native American nonprofit sector leaders will receive a significant boost from a leadership training program organized by First Nations Development Institute

The next generation of Native American nonprofit sector leaders will receive a significant boost from a leadership training program organized by First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) and funded by a consortium of private foundations as well as contributions from individual supporters.

Grants of $300,000 over three years from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, $400,000 over two years from the Ford Foundation and $25,000 from American Express will support the Leadership and Entrepreneurial Apprenticeship Development (LEAD) program for up-and-coming, nonprofit executives serving Native American communities in Oregon, Washington and Colorado. In all, 60 Native American nonprofit professionals will be trained during the three-year grant period.

LEAD will develop a new pool of nonprofit leaders to meet the needs of the growing Native American nonprofit sector. LEAD Fellows are employed by a nonprofit organization or planning a career in the nonprofit sector, are committed to a career working in Native communities, and are affiliated with a tribe. In fall 2008, LEAD graduated 12 Fellows. For information about the 2007 – 2008 LEAD graduates and the 2008 – 2009 class of LEAD Fellows, visit www.firstnations.org.

In Oregon, Washington and Colorado, respectively, partner organizations – the Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA), the Potlatch Fund and NVision– will organize and host the training sessions for the Fellows with facilitation and support fromFirst Nations.

“We are so pleased to expand this program that builds the capacity of Native nonprofit organizations,” said First Nations’ President, Michael E. Roberts. “By concentrating resources on our communities’ most important asset – our people – we can build strong communities and tribal institutions.”

The one-year mentorship program will train participants in areas critical to successful nonprofit leaders, including financial management, factors affecting Native or reservation-based nonprofit organizations, fundraising, program evaluation and service leadership.

About First Nations Development Institute
Through a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating for Systemic Change, and Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations Development Institute is working to restore Native control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities. First Nations Development Institute is a national, nonprofit, Native American-led organization.

For more information about this program, contact Sarah Vermillion, Vice President of First Nations Development Institute, at 303-774-7836 / svermillion@firstnations.org.

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The Slingsby Trolley Challenge Cup pits London’s finest hotels against each other in a fancy dress trolley race across Vincent Square, to support one of the UKs leading education and training charities

One of London’s finest squares was recently the scene of the very first Springboard Slingsby Challenge Cup. The capital’s hotel industry along with hospitality and culinary arts students from Westminster Kingsway College sent teams piled high on Slingsby trolleys in a charity race around Vincent Square to support one of the UK’s leading education and training charities.

The brightly decorated trolleys set off in a grand prix-style race around the square after the race was started by Viscount Thurso, M.P, a patron of the hospitality industry for many years and President of the Tourism Society and the Academy of Food and Wine Service.

The race featured teams from the Hyatt Regency London – The Churchill; Como Hotels & Resorts – The Metropolitan Hotel; The Goring; the Four Seasons – London; RAC Club; Institute of Directors Club; Aramark – Contract Caterers; The Langham Hotel; The Savoy Hotel; The Sheraton Park Lane and The Royal Garden Hotel as well as a team of students chefs from Westminster Kingsway College.

The event was held in aid of the Springboard Charitable Trust, one of the only charities in the UK dedicated to helping young and disadvantaged people improve their prospects by training them in a career in hospitality, leisure, travel or tourism.

It is essential for the industry to find new employees for the future and especially in time for the Olympics in 2012. The hospitality sector, including representatives’ of many of London’s internationally renowned hotels competed against each other in a comical trolley race to win the Slingsby Cup and declare themselves victorious.

The trolley race saw a number of brightly decorated teams dressed as the Flintstones, the Hollywood Stars and The Churchillians take part and prizes were awarded for the best decorated trolley and team, trolley navigating skills, style, courtesy and elegance. The race was sponsored by Slingsby Trolleys, the vehicles without which the hotel industry could not operate.

Slingsby manufacture high quality, adaptable and distinctive industrial equipment, and their product has become the preferred choice of several leading high street retailers, including Marks & Spencer and Harvey Nichols as well as many major hotels chains.

About Slignsby
Established in 1893, Slingsby are consistently improving their manufacturing pedigree through investment in new technology. Although famous originally for manual handling equipment, their latest catalogue features a range of over 35,000 essential products for the workplace, such as barrows, conveyors, handtrucks, janitorial and office equipment.

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