Tag Archives: Non Profit 501(c)3

Charity Fishing Tourney: A REEL Success

Puerto Vallarta was the destination for anglers and golfers who participated in this year’s BJ’s Restaurants Hook the Cure Tournament powered by IOTEC. The nearly sold-out tournament took place on November 6th and 7th and reeled in a whopping $345,000 NET for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation.

The IGFA-qualifier brought two dozen boats and 40 teams. The competition started on Friday morning as anglers met early at the docks and eagerly awaited the strike of six marking the start of the catch and release competition coordinated by Kim and Ed Moore of Marina-based Charter Dreams.

Weekend festivities included a pre-tournament Mexican fiesta and fireworks show at Villa Premiere Hotel and Spa; Friday night concert by RCA Recording Artist Chris Young who celebrated his #1 song on the country charts; golf at Vista Vallarta’s challenging Nicklaus course; a lively dockside weigh-in party with food and beverage provided by Andale Restaurant and an awards gala and auction, sponsored by American Airlines and hosted by Los Angeles radio personality Shawn Parr. For those that just wanted to relax, Villa Premiere’s world-class spa was just a few steps away. Puerto Vallarta rental agency, PVRPV, provided volunteers for the festivities.

As excited spectators and sponsors filled the Marina, most boats made it in by five in anticipation of the results. The team of Tom Paige and Jon Louis were rewarded with a 2010 IGFA Offshore World Championship entry in Cabo San Lucas as OVERALL CHAMPIONS with five dorado and seven released sailfish. Lucille Zabel and Lydia Francis captured the coveted MOST RELEASED BILLFISH award while Craig Porpoat and David Bales garnered the BIGGEST DORADO AWARD and Anchorage’s Kris Kile took home the CHAIRMAN’S AWARD. Awards were donated by Gray’s Taxidermy of Puerto Vallarta.

According to Bob Huston and Jeff Jennison, 2009 event chairmen, $1.3 million NET was generated for cystic fibrosis patient care, research and education since the tournaments inception just four years ago. Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disease affecting approximately 40,000 people in the United States and Mexico. A defect in the CF gene causes the body to produce abnormally thick, sticky mucus that leads to chronic, life-threatening lung infections and impairs digestion. When the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation was established in 1955, few children lived to even attend elementary school. Today because of research and care supported by the CF Foundation with money raised through donations from families, corporations and foundations the median predicted age for people with CF is nearly 37 years.

In addition to BJ’s Restaurants and IOTEC, significant financial support was provided by Norm Wilson and Sons, O’Connell Family Foundation, Toshiba, Watson Land Company, Ron and Ann Hallagan, Toshiba, Millie and Severson, William Close Family and Lee & Associates.

Plans are underway for the Fifth Annual Hook the Cure slated for early-November 2010. Information about the ultimate fishing, golf and spa adventure benefiting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is available by contacting Gary Green, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation’s Director of Corporate Development, at (714) 494-4623 in the US or 322 150-7214 in Puerto Vallarta. A new Hook the Cure website will be unveiled shortly at www.hookthecure.com and will feature an interactive photo gallery thanks to Nuevo Vallarta resident and award-winning photographer Jay Ailworth.

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First Nations Development Institute Releases Research Report On 7871 Organizations

First Nations Development Institute recently completed a research project on 7871 charitable organizations, their institutional structures, and best practices for their management. This research resulted in a report titled Charitable and Sovereign: Understanding Tribal 7871 Organizations.

In 1982, Congress passed the Indian Tribal Governmental Tax Status Act, codified as Section 7871 of the Internal Revenue Code, treating tribal governments as state governments for a variety of specified tax purposes. One of these purposes was to allow tribal governments and their programs to receive tax-deductible donations. Many tribes have used the 7871 tax code to develop tribal charitable and philanthropic organizations. These organizations include educational scholarship programs, economic development organizations, and grant making foundations.

First Nations’ research revealed that while there are a large number of these so called “7871 organizations” that provide social service, economic development, educational, and other charitable programming, only a small number of them are actively raising external funds. Most such programs are funded by tribal governments or federal funding streams. However, as tribes look to diversify both their programs and funding streams, an increasing number of tribal programs are using Section 7871 to facilitate fundraising as charitable organizations. Use of the Section 7871 designation to create philanthropic and charitable entities is increasingly popular as tribes seek ways to protect their sovereignty while still promoting philanthropic activities.

The report had the following additional key findings:

1. There is great programmatic and organizational diversity among 7871 organizations.
2. There are significant barriers to fundraising for 7871 organizations.
3. The myth of “rich gaming tribes” persists as a barrier to fundraising for 7871 organizations.
4. Federal legislation is inconsistent in its treatment of 7871 organizations and their eligibility for federal grant programs.
5. There are a large number of tribes that have spun off 501(c)(3) organizations to remove barriers to fundraising.
6. There is a need to establish best practices to reassure prospective donors to 7871 organizations.

“We hope this report will raise awareness about the important role that 7871 organizations play in providing services to tribal members,” stated Michael E. Roberts, President of First Nations Development Institute. “There is still a lot of confusion about what these organizations are and what they do. We hope this report will clarify many issues.” One goal of the report is to educate program officers at foundations so they are more comfortable working with 7871 organizations. “We hope to educate members of mainstream philanthropy on this topic,” stated Sarah Vermillion, Vice President for First Nations Development Institute.

First Nations’ research included a national survey and case studies and interviews with five active or former 7871 organizations. This research was funded by the Cultures of Giving Fund, established at the Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors with major support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

To download a free copy of this report, visit our website at www.firstnations.org and follow the links from the home page.

For more than 28 years, using a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating for Systemic Change, Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations Development Institute has been working to restore Native American control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities. First Nations serves rural and reservation-based Native American communities throughout the United States.

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The Great Homecoming and Bill Partridge Retirement Celebration will be held November 13th at the Azleway Boys’ Ranch Training Center

A Great Homecoming and Retirement Celebration is scheduled for November 13, 2009 at the Azleway Boys’ Ranch Training Center, 158992 County Road 26, Tyler Texas. Founder and CEO of Azleway, Inc., Billy M. Partridge, will be retiring after 30 years of service and dedication to the needy children of East Texas. Bill started Azleway with only seven children. Today, Azleway serves more than 1,000 abandoned and abused children a year from over ninety Texas counties.

Everyone is welcome to share in the love that this great man has brought to Azleway. Former children of Azleway, current and former employees, current and past board members, donors, sponsors, friends, family and acquaintances are all invited for an evening of refreshments, appetizers and memories. Presentations will be held at 6:00 p.m.

Donations are currently being accepted to build the Bill and Dana Partridge Boys’ Cottage at Azleway Boys’ Ranch. $160,000 is needed to complete the cottage that will house ten boys in need of the love, care and attention that they so dearly need in their lives.

About Azleway
The mission of Azleway is to provide a home, school and treatment opportunities with intervention and prevention strategies to children and their families from a faith based perspective in order to increase their abilities to succeed in life.

For more information about Azleway or to donate to the Bill and Dana Partridge Boys’ Cottage Fund contact Aleta Lewis at (903) 566-8444 ext. 212 or see our website at www.azleway.org.

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First Nations Receives $800,000 Grant

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) announced today that it has been awarded a two-year, $800,000 grant f r o m a new program of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the Strengthening Communities Fund (SCF), created by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. First Nations will also provide an additional $200,000 in funding to the project bringing the total budget to $1 million (80% Federal funds and 20% nongovernmental sources) over two years.

The objective of the grant is to enable nonprofit organizations to contribute to the economic recovery and help Federal, State, local, and Indian/Native American Tribal governments ensure that the information and services described in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) reach disadvantaged and hard-to-serve populations. The grant to First Nations is f r o m the Nonprofit Capacity Building program which made one-time awards up to $1 million to experienced lead organizations to provide nonprofit organizations — or project partners — with capacity building training, technical assistance, and competitive financial assistance. A minimum of 55% of the Federal funds awarded must be provided to project partners through a competitive (subgrant) process.

Specifically, through this grant project, First Nations will work to build the capacity of nonprofit organizations, whether secular or faith based, to address the broad economic recovery issues present in their (Native American) communities. With SCF funding, First Nations Development Institute will provide nonprofit capacity building services to targeted rural and reservation-based Native American communities in the United States. Project participants will be selected f r o m 22 targeted Native American communities located in Arizona, Minnesota, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Utah that have excessive poverty and low income statistics according to the U.S. Census.

Services will include providing comprehensive organizational effectiveness assessment for each of the organizations or groups selected; culturally appropriate training in organizational development; program development; collaboration/community engagement; leadership development; evaluation of effectiveness and development of individualized, tailored and culturally appropriate technical assistance plans. Recipients will be formally organized 501(c)(3) nonprofit organizations, tribal§7871 organizations or community organizations which have not achieved this status. Recipients will be Native American-controlled and will serve the targeted rural or reservation-based Native American communities. Native American groups that are faith-based will be eligible to participate in this SCF-funded project, as long as the programs or services that will improve in capacity as a result of this project will not include inherently religious activities. Additionally, First Nations will provide $440,000 in grants to rural and reservation-based Native American nonprofit organizations and community groups for the purpose of capacity building in the areas listed above.

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Every Day 5,760 More Children Become Orphans

The statistics are startling: it’s estimated that there are 143 million orphans worldwide. Even though many children are adopted, many more grow up as orphans and age out of the system by age sixteen – with no family to belong to and no place to call home.

In a perfect world, there would be no orphans and no need for adoptions. Families would stay intact, and children would be raised by loving parents and/or grandparents, but this is not the reality for all too many orphans.

Won’t you join with me in caring for the urgent needs of poverty-stricken orphans throughout the United States? Together we can make a difference for precious children who are alone in the world.

Invest in a better world for orphaned children …

We are seeking generous partners to provide resources that will give these children a future filled with hope. In addition to financial donations, please consider other ways that you can help. Orphanages can use a variety of material resources – cars, property, computers, medical supplies, clothing, furniture, bedding, toys, etc. Your contribution will bless disadvantaged orphans as well as impact future generations.

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Cincinnati Home Stagers And Realtor Donate Time And Money To Provide Living Hope Transitional Homes

Living Hope Transitional Homes, www.lhth.org is a private, nondenominational, nonprofit organization that helps homeless women ages 18-30 with children ages 10 and under. It provides loving encouragement, secure housing and spiritual renewal that gives women a living hope that never fades as they learn skills that allow them to become stable and independent through their Life Skills Program.

Two local ASP (Accredited Staging Professional) home stagers, local real estate agent and consignment shop owner made a dream come true for Living Home Transitional Homes by designing, funding and providing labor to give Living Hope a new jungle themed playroom.

Design execution, labor and funding
Staging To Sell – Home Staging – Rita Basquette, ASP
www.Staging-to-sell.com 513-608-5066

Elite Staged Properties – Home Staging – Becky Ballentine, ASP
513-315-0164

Labor and Funding
Jim Basquette Real Estate Group of Huff Realty
Jim Basquette, Realtor
www.JimSellsHomes.com 513-703-6523

Funding
2nd Chance Consignment – consignment shop – Sue Hater
Glenway Crossing
www.Shop2ndChance.com 513-451-1451

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Hobbs Foundation of Tampa Bay Offers $10,000 Grants to Local Organizations Serving Underprivileged Children

The Hobbs Foundation announced they are accepting requests for $10,000 grants for charitable organizations throughout the state of Florida. The foundation, established in 2003, offers financial support to organizations that provide exceptional care and services to underprivileged children. Since 2003, the Hobbs Foundation has strived to improve the lives of children in Florida by providing the means necessary for children to overcome challenges and create opportunities for healthy growth and development.

hobbsfoundation

“On behalf of the Hobbs family and the Hobbs Foundation, it is with great pleasure that we offer support to organizations that are dedicated to educating, mentoring, and nurturing deserving children that allows them to reach for a brighter future”, said Hobbs Foundation Grant Administrator, Amanda Long. “With these organizations’ help, we can offer opportunities to disadvantaged youth in our community that would otherwise not be possible.”

The Hobbs Foundation is a non-profit, grant-making foundation whose mission is to form partnerships with charitable organizations whose work directly benefits underserved children allowing them to expand their outreach to children in need. The foundation is accepting grant requests through the end of August to qualified non-profit organizations. For more information or to apply for funding, visit the foundation’s website at www.hobbsfoundation.com.

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Kids’ Meals is Stomping Out Hunger in Houston

“Texas ranks 3rd in the nation for food insecurity, meaning one in five adults and one in four children in our state are hungry,” says Texas Department of Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples. “That is simply unacceptable.”

kidsmealshouston

A plummeting economy and spiraling unemployment have left hundreds of Houston families struggling with the bare essentials. Kids’ Meals is stepping into the gap, delivering nutritious meals to kids in an attempt to stomp out hunger in Houston.

Kids’ Meals is a 501(c)3 non-profit, community based Meals on Wheels program for pre-school aged children that live in poverty. The program was first launched in Houston in 1984.

Today Kids’ Meals provides lunches to over 1,200 pre-school aged children living in poverty who otherwise might never see a nutritious meal. The program runs Monday through Friday all year long, helping to close the gap between families’ income and the needs of their growing kids. But it’s not enough.

“The need for Kids’ Meals is ever-growing due to the increase of food and gas prices as well as the slowing economy,” says Kids’ Meals spokesperson Bonnie Leach. “Layoffs and downsizing have more families finding themselves in need of food. We hope to be the first city to have no hungry children.”

“Kids’ Meals has hundreds of children on their waiting list ready to be fed,” adds Leach. “[We] need your support through donations, volunteer time and spreading the word.”

For less than $1.50 a day a nutritious lunch will be delivered to a hungry child, free of charge to each family.

“”Kids’ Meals needs your support through donations, volunteering your time and spreading the word by helping us fulfill our mission of ending hunger among Houston area children,” states Leach.

For more information on Kids’ Meals visit them on the web at www.KidsMealsHouston.org.

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First Nations Launches Native Asset Building Partnership Project

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) released the names of the advisory committee members for its new Native Asset-Building Partnership. Members include Anita Fineday, Chief Judge of the White Earth Tribal Nation; Tadd Johnson, Special Counsel for Government Affairs for the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwe; Susan White, Director of the Oneida Trust Department; former Senior Vice President and board member of First Nations, Sherry Salway Black; Elsie Meeks, Director of the USDA Rural Development Office; attorney Margaret Schaff, partner at Schaff & Clark-Deschene; Tracy Fischer, Interim President of the First Nations Oweesta Cooperation; and Michael E. Roberts, President of First Nations Development Institute.

The goal of the Native Asset-Building Partnership Project is to strengthen tribal and Native institutions in Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota through tribal nation-to-nation peer learning and model development that will lead to improved control and management of assets for the benefit of Native communities and individuals. Advisory committee member Susan White said, “Peer mentoring will provide ideas and processes on how Indians as the true stakeholders can gain greater control over their own assets. Applying mentoring objectives will elevate a tribe’s ability to be more self-determined and therefore gain greater control over their own assets.”

First Nations’ goal is to partner tribes around specified assets and allow them to share best practices for asset stewardship and management. “Through this project we will be able to continue to ask questions from our brothers and sisters at other tribal nations and create long-term enduring benefit to Indian Country,” notes advisory committee member Anita Fineday who is Chief Judge of the White Earth Tribal Nation located in White Earth, Minnesota.

Sherry Salway Black said “assets are incredibly important for individuals, families, communities, and nations – including tribal nations. The ownership, control, management and development of current assets and creation and acquisition of new assets taken together are wealth and assure a better future.”

The Native Asset-Building Project advisory committee is composed of national and regional leaders familiar with asset-building in Native American communities. “First Nations is grateful to have the participation of such well respected national and regional leaders in Indian Country,” said Michael E. Roberts. The project advisory committee will assist in engaging tribes and Native organizations in the targeted states to determine asset-building needs and regionally-relevant models and assist in the planning and hosting of an asset-building conference that will take place in Minneapolis, Minnesota this fall.

The Native American Asset Building Project is a two-year project funded by the Otto Bremer Foundation, based in Saint Paul, Minnesota. For more information about First Nations’ Native Asset Building Project, contact Raymond Foxworth, Research Officer for First Nations at 303-774-7836 or rfoxworth@firstnations.org.

About First Nations Development Institute
Founded in 1980, First Nations Development Institute is a national Native American-led nonprofit organization. Through a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating for Systemic Change, and Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations Development Institute is working to restore Native control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities. To learn more about First Nations, visit: www.firstnations.org.

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Refund Anticipation Loans Cost EITC Filers In Native Communities Over $9,100,000 In 2005

Tax day has come and gone, and this year many people opted to get their tax refund a quick but expensive way: they took out a Refund Anticipation Loan. A Refund Anticipation Loan (or RAL) is a one to two week loan made by banks on behalf of filers, facilitated by tax preparers, and secured by a taxpayer’s expected tax refund. RALs are marketed as a way to “get your money quickly” and result in the users paying substantial fees to access their tax refund usually only five to ten days faster than for tax returns filed electronically. The average expense of the one to two week loan can be the equivalent of 50 to 500 percent APR, depending on the total fee and loan term. According to a report just released by First Nations Development Institute and the Center for Responsible Lending, Refund Anticipation Loans drained over $9,100,000 from Native American communities in 2005.

First Nations Development Institute and the Center for Responsible Lending’s report Borrowed Time: Use of Refund Anticipation Loans Among EITC Filers in Native American Communities documents the use of these costly loan programs on reservations and in other Native American communities. Researchers looked at the use of Refund Anticipation Loans in ten states with high Native American populations, and found that residents in counties with a large Native American population (such as counties with reservations in their boundaries) were more likely to take out Refund Anticipation Loans than residents of other counties. This is true despite the remote rural location of many of these counties, where there are few tax preparation businesses. In South Dakota, residents of counties with a high Native American population are five times as likely to take out a Refund Anticipation Loan. In North Dakota, residents of counties with a high Native American population are 11 times as likely to take out a Refund Anticipation Loan.

Most striking is the fact that the use of RALs is quite high among tax filers receiving the Earned Income Tax Credit in Native communities. The Earned Income Tax Credit was originally designed to supplement the earnings of low-to-moderate income families, and in 2009 a family of four could qualify for up to $4,824 in tax credits. Borrowed Time: Use of Refund Anticipation Loans Among EITC Filers in Native American Communities documents that in some Native communities, over seven out of every ten EITC filers received a RAL. In one county in South Dakota, nine out of every ten EITC filers received a RAL. In South Dakota, 8% of every EITC credit in Native communities was spent on taking out a RAL. This means that eight cents of every $1.00 of EITC credit in Native communities was diverted from its original target, working families, and instead went into the pockets of paid tax preparers.

Because Refund Anticipation Loans have a significant cost for Native communities, Borrowed Time: Use of Refund Anticipation Loans Among EITC Filers in Native American Communities provides recommendations for reducing their use. The first recommendation is to increase and support Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) sites in and near Native communities to allow filers to access free tax preparation services. In many cases, EITC filers and other filers may simply not be aware that they can access their tax refund without using a RAL. The authors of the report also recommend establishing an interest rate cap for RALs, and conducting public education campaigns in Native communities to encourage people to avoid paying high fees for RALs.

This landmark report is the result of a research study conducted under a grant funded by the Annie E. Casey Foundation. For more information about this publication, contact Sarah Dewees, Director of Research for First Nations Development Institute, at 540-907-6247 / sdewees@firstnations.org; or visit First Nations Development Institute’s website at www.firstnations.org to download a free copy of the paper.

Through a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating Systemic Change, and Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations is working to restore Native control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities.

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Bringing The Sierra To The State Capital: Sierra Nevada Leaders Honored With Vision 2020 Award In Sacramento

Some of the greatest things happen under conditions of adversity and at Sierra Business Council we’re committed to approaches that create opportunity from those exact circumstances. Community members, organizations, and businesses are still doing great work, doubling their efforts, and calling for change despite the economic downturn and the uncertainty we face.

Each year, the regional sustainability non-profit, Sierra Business Council, hosts an event to recognize and encourage leadership in the Sierra, honoring community members as their work continues to achieve excellence in projects and approaches that foster community vitality, environmental quality, economic prosperity, and social fairness.

Throughout the Sierra, we recognize the growing need to bridge the divide between rural and urban communities in California. Bringing our Vision 2020 celebration to Sacramento does just that. Steve Frisch, SBC President

As a way to highlight the issue, this year’s theme for the Vision 2020 Awards is a Sierra Getaway Party. This free event is open to anyone who wants to “escape to the Sierra” for the evening.

Sierra Business Council’s 2008 Vision 2020 Awards Celebration features presentations from Vision 2020 Award winners and appetizers and dessert sourced from the Sierra with the help of the Placer Gold Slow Food chapter.

This year’s winners include the partnership between Executive Chef Mark Estee of Moody’s Bistro & Lounge, Baxter’s Bistro and Lounge, and Founder of Burger Me in Truckee, CA and Gary Romano from Sierra Valley Farms. This duo has demonstrated support for sustainable food in the Sierra Valley, Lake Tahoe and Placer County areas. Gary and Mark’s relationship demonstrates commitment to local farmers and sustainable agriculture.

John Wentworth of Mammoth Lakes is being honored for his accomplishments with Mammoth Lakes Trails and Public Access (MLTPA). MLTPA has worked diligently to bring much-deserved focus and attention to the future of the Mammoth community and its critical relationship with environmental resources. MLTPA has engaged with Town government, federal agencies, other nonprofits, the public, and private businesses to work collaboratively toward its mission.

Paul Hardy, Executive Director of Feather River Land Trust, has been awarded for his achievement in building one of the most effective and enduring land trusts in California. Paul has demonstrated a remarkable commitment to partnership and collaboration and has imparted a strong ethic of conservation among many leaders.

Phil Carville, President and CEO of Carville Sierra Inc., a family owned and operated development company, is being awarded for his outstanding work on the Loma Rica Ranch project in the City of Grass Valley. Phil has become one of the region’s most determined spokesmen for New Urbanism, Traditional Neighborhood Design, and Smart Growth within the Sierra Nevada.

SBC’s 2008 Vision 2020 Awards Celebration takes place on Thursday, March 19, 2009 from 6:00-10:00pm and is hosted at The Grand Ballroom in Sacramento, CA located at 629 J Street. Please visit www.sbcouncil.org for more information.

RSVP requested at www.sbcouncil.org/celebratesierra

Sierra Business Council is hosting a press conference for its annual Vision 2020 Awards starting promptly at 5:30pm at The Grand Ballroom the evening of the 19th. Press packet can be found online at www.sbcouncil.org Tuesday the 17th.

About Sierra Business Council
The Sierra Business Council serves the entire Sierra Nevada region. As a nonprofit association of more than 750 businesses, agencies, and individual members, Sierra Business Council is committed to promoting a new perspective on regional wealth while emphasizing collaboration in planning and policy making.

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The next generation of Native American nonprofit sector leaders will receive a significant boost from a leadership training program organized by First Nations Development Institute

The next generation of Native American nonprofit sector leaders will receive a significant boost from a leadership training program organized by First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) and funded by a consortium of private foundations as well as contributions from individual supporters.

Grants of $300,000 over three years from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, $400,000 over two years from the Ford Foundation and $25,000 from American Express will support the Leadership and Entrepreneurial Apprenticeship Development (LEAD) program for up-and-coming, nonprofit executives serving Native American communities in Oregon, Washington and Colorado. In all, 60 Native American nonprofit professionals will be trained during the three-year grant period.

LEAD will develop a new pool of nonprofit leaders to meet the needs of the growing Native American nonprofit sector. LEAD Fellows are employed by a nonprofit organization or planning a career in the nonprofit sector, are committed to a career working in Native communities, and are affiliated with a tribe. In fall 2008, LEAD graduated 12 Fellows. For information about the 2007 – 2008 LEAD graduates and the 2008 – 2009 class of LEAD Fellows, visit www.firstnations.org.

In Oregon, Washington and Colorado, respectively, partner organizations – the Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA), the Potlatch Fund and NVision– will organize and host the training sessions for the Fellows with facilitation and support fromFirst Nations.

“We are so pleased to expand this program that builds the capacity of Native nonprofit organizations,” said First Nations’ President, Michael E. Roberts. “By concentrating resources on our communities’ most important asset – our people – we can build strong communities and tribal institutions.”

The one-year mentorship program will train participants in areas critical to successful nonprofit leaders, including financial management, factors affecting Native or reservation-based nonprofit organizations, fundraising, program evaluation and service leadership.

About First Nations Development Institute
Through a three-pronged strategy of Educating Grassroots Practitioners, Advocating for Systemic Change, and Capitalizing Indian Communities, First Nations Development Institute is working to restore Native control and culturally-compatible stewardship of the assets they own – be they land, human potential, cultural heritage, or natural resources – and to establish new assets for ensuring the long-term vitality of Native communities. First Nations Development Institute is a national, nonprofit, Native American-led organization.

For more information about this program, contact Sarah Vermillion, Vice President of First Nations Development Institute, at 303-774-7836 / svermillion@firstnations.org.

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After only 3 months since the loss of their son, the Tiegers have raised over $10k for stillbirth awareness and research

Imagine you or someone in your family went to the hospital expecting to deliver a baby, just to find out that the baby was dead.

Stillbirth devastates 83 families everyday in this country. Nearly 1 in 100 births will result in stillbirth. There are more stillbirths every year than all causes of infant death combined – including SIDS. It is for thesereasons and many more that Jeff and Lori Tieger of Staten Island, NY created Daniel’s STAR (The Daniel Ian Tieger Fund for STillbirth Awareness and Research). The organization is named for their son Daniel Ian Tieger, who was born still on February 8, 2007 just 7 days shy of his due date.

Daniel’s STAR raises money for the MISS Foundation, a national volunteer based non-profit organization committed to providing crisis support and long term aid to families after the death of a child from any cause. All of the money raised will fund MISS programs for research and public education of stillbirth. MISS boasts a 7% administrative cost so 93 cents of every dollar will actually go to its intended location.

Daniel’s STAR is hosting their first annual Shining STAR Golf Classic Monday July 30, 2007 at LaTourette Golf Course in Staten Island, NY. Registration is now open and spots are filling fast. For only $150, players will enjoy lunch before tee off, various challenges throughout the event, and a BBQ Awards Dinner to present prizes to the challenge winners. In addition to the golf classic, Daniel’s STAR will be host the first annual Memorial Walk in the Park tentatively scheduled for early October. “We just want to spread the word and give this issue the long overdue attention it deserves”, said Lori Tieger.

In the 3 months since they lost their son, the Tiegers have been responsible for raising over $10,000 for stillbirth research and awareness. “Just as any parent would do anything within their power for their child, this is all we could do for ours”, Jeff Tieger said. In addition to fund raising, the Tiegers have been back and forth to Albany meeting with legislators and lobbying for the MISSing Angels Bill. This bill provides a Certificate of Birth Resulting in Stillbirth. Currently New York and most other states do not provide any recognition of the existence of stillborn babies, or the birth process that they and their mothers endured. Along with the other parents at the meetings, the Tiegers were responsible for the first movement of the bill since it was introduced into the New York State Government in 2003.

For more information about Daniel’s STAR, their community events, or the MISSing Angels Bill, contact Daniel’s STAR.

 

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Welcome to EPR Non Profit News

EPR Non Profit News is a new blog, part of EPR Network, that is going to be focused on and will be covering the non profit news and stories from press releases published on EPR Network.

EPR Network (EPR stands for express press release) is one of the nation’s largest press release distribution networks on Web. The EPR’s nationwide network includes 12 State based PR sites, one major PR forum and a number of industry specific PR blogs and what started as a hobby on Internet years ago turned out to be a rapidly growing business today. EPR Network is also known as one of the most trusted (human optimized, published, edited and monitored, spam/scam/low quality PR content free) PR sites on the web with more than 10,000 company and individual press releases distributed per month. EPR Network is putting your press releases on top of all major search engines’ results and is reaching thousands of individuals, companies, PR specialists, media professionals, bloggers and journalists every day.

EPR Network has thousands of clients around the world including global 500 corporations like Hilton Hotels, Barclays Bank, AXA Insurance, Tesco UK, eBay/Skype, Emirates, just to name a few. The network’s PR web sites are currently reaching from 150,000 to sometimes 500,000 unique visitors per month while our viral reach could possibly go to as much as 1M people per month through our presence across various social media sites. EPR Network was established in 2004 and as of May 2008 it had more than 800,000 press releases (pages) published on its network.

If you have a press release to be distributed, you can do it over here: press release distribution